Is this REAL? Does digital breakthrough reveal truth about infamous Bigfoot footage?

The contentious clip was first released in 1967, sending shockwaves across the globe after the filmmakers claimed this shows the first-ever footage of a female Bigfoot.

Roger Patterson and Robert “Bob” Gimlin shot the video in a remote area of northern California, maintaining that the shaky clip was completely genuine for years after the event.

Footage shows a giant gorilla-like creature striding across the woods, but standing upright like a human, before turning around and glaring at the camera.

The Bigfoot or Sasquatch myth says a mysterious species of ape men, which walk on two legs, roams the US wilderness – in the same way that the mythical Yeti is said to in the Himalayas.

In the stabilised video, after a couple of moments, the beast quickly disappears from view into the thick undergrowth.

New video-editing techniques have allowed Bigfoot researchers to stabilise and digitally enhance the 50-year-old clip.

Clearer pictures of the creature show the alleged Bigfoot walking with a similar stride to a human.

The stabilised clip was posted on social media site Reddit, reigniting the debate, Dailystar.co.uk[1] reports.

One Reddit user said the digital enhancement only proved it was fake.

He said: “I’ve never seen something look more like a man in a costume.”

Another said: “This makes this clip absolutely laughable.”

A third said: “I must have seen the original video a bunch of times already.

“Sometimes I wondered if it was real or fake. Now that I’m seeing this – it feels kinda fake.”

The original video was widely branded a fake in January 1999, when Bob Heironimus – an accomplice of filmmaker Roger Patterson – claimed he was the man inside the gorilla suit.

He said in a press release: “I’m telling the truth. I’m tired after 37 years.”

Some people were still clinging onto the possibility it is real.

One said: “It’s spooky. On an old CRT display with the original clip, that part where Bigfoot glances at you is bone-chilling.”

References

  1. ^ Dailystar.co.uk (www.dailystar.co.uk)
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